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Airlines are generally a very safe means of travel. However, if you’re a senior traveller with health issues, you should check with
your doctor before flying, especially in the following situations:
Health
Pulse
When flying can be
dangerous to your health
X
X
You have an upper respiratory infection that involves
middle-ear or sinus problems. Wait to fly once any
middle-ear blockage has been cleared.
X
X
You have recently had eye or brain surgery.
X
X
You have a history of seizures and are not well
controlled on medication.
X
X
You have recently been discharged from the hospital.
X
X
You have an active lung infection, especially tuberculosis or
chronic lung disease, or are recovering from pneumonia.
X
X
You are over 65 years old and intend to fly for more than six
hours on any given leg of your flight.
X
X
You are on multiple medications for an advanced chronic
illness such as heart failure or any chronic airflow
condition.
The combination of low cabin pressure, low humidity, cramped seating, noise, “bumpy air” and inactivity may pose problems
for senior travellers. Cabin pressure/oxygenation affects blood oxygenation in persons with cardiac problems or vascular
conditions. Motion sickness from a rough flight, although not dangerous to a healthy traveller, can affect a frail senior who is
also compromised from the variety of environmental factors mentioned above. Some people prefer to fly at night, choosing
seats away from the airline engines and taking advantage of low cabin lighting to reduce visual stimuli. Hearing aids can be
shut off or turned down to help minimize aircraft noise.
Reference: Livestrong.com