Page 69 - CSANews 89

Basic HTML Version

69
CSANews
|
WINTER 2013
Grins
& giggles
Say it s-l-o-w-l-y
A man and his wife were driving their RV across Florida and were
nearing a town called Kissimmee. They noted the strange spelling
and tried to figure how to pronounce it – KISS-a-me; kis-A-me;
kis-a-ME?
They grew more perplexed as they drove into the town. Since
they were hungry, they pulled into a restaurant to get something
to eat. At the counter, the man said to the waitress, “My wife and
I can’t seem to be able to figure out how to pronounce this place.
Will you tell me where we are and say it very slowly so that I can
understand?”
The woman looked at him and said; “Buuurrrgerrr Kiiiinnnng.”
Travel Agent Stories
A student was heading home for the holidays. When she got to the
airline counter, she presented her ticket to Florida. As she gave the
agent her luggage, she made the remark, “I’d like you to send my
beige suitcase to Hawaii, and my blue suitcase to London.”
The confused agent said, “I’m sorry, we can’t do that.”
“Really???” cried the student. “I am so relieved to hear you say that
because that’s exactly what you did to my luggage last year!”
Beware the Alligators
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
is advising hikers, hunters, fishers and golfers to take
extra precautions and to keep alert for alligators while
in Osceola, Polk, Brevard and Orange Counties. They
advise people to wear noise-producing devices…such
as little bells on their clothing…so as to alert, but not
startle, the alligators.
They also recommend carrying pepper spray in case
of an encounter with an alligator. It is also a good idea
to watch for fresh signs of alligator
activity. People should recognize
the difference between
small, young alligator
droppings and large,
adult alligator droppings.
Young alligator droppings
are smaller and contain fish
bones and possibly bird
feathers.
Adult alligator droppings
have little bells in them
and smell like pepper
spray.